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Friday, July 01, 2016

Microsoft’s Collaboration with the Prisons Department of Malaysia

Jun 30, 2016:

Microsoft Malaysia announced a three-year partnership with the Malaysian Prisons Department (under the purview of the Ministry of Home Affairs), to provide approximately 500 juvenile inmates, aged 16 to 21, across 13 prison schools, digital literacy and upskilling opportunities in digital inclusion, entrepreneurship and capacity building.

The main objective of this collaboration was to prepare these individuals for employability, and to pursue further educational opportunities upon their release. Microsoft also shared that the collaboration would see these inmates receiving benefits through programs with Microsoft volunteers, student partners and NGO partners such as Yayasan Generasi Gemilang. Inmates from the prison schools would be trained to use basic computer programs such as Microsoft Word, PowerPoint and Excel. The company is also looking at providing training to teachers from the prison in the areas of digital literacy, which would help them to impart the necessary skills required to improve leaning outcomes.



(L-R: 4th from left) TKP Dato’ Narander Singh, Kajang Prison Director; Jasmine Begum, Director of Corporate, External & Legal Affairs, Microsoft Malaysia and Emerging Markets; TKJP Dato' Haji Hassan bin Sakimon, Deputy Commissioner General, Malaysian Prisons Department; Mary Snapp, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Philanthropies; and KP Dato’ Jamaluddin Saad, Director, Management of Inmate Division, Prisons Department of Malaysia, pictured on stage together at the announcement today


Today’s announcement also marks the company’s second collaboration with the Prisons Department of Malaysia. Last year, Microsoft Malaysia’s Hour of Code initiative introduced over 160 Henry Gurney Prison School inmates to a specially created “Minecraft” coding tutorial, in which students and educators learnt about the basics of coding – allowing them to navigate, mine, craft and explore in a two-dimensional “Minecraft” world, plugging together blocks to complete actions and generate code.

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